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on that and say it's already here. so the idea that we should wait for the science to get better, i think, is just, it's too late for that. so the cat is already out of the bag. the question is what do you do now that it's in the courtroom. well, we have dualing experts. we have judges sitting in a gate keeping role who have to decide whether or not the evidence should be admissible and whether it should be permitted in a case. my view is that the more evidence that we can provide to a scrr or to a judge -- jury or to a judge in their decision makings, some objective evidence, some evidence to bolster things like a diagnosis of schizophrenia or i.q., all the better. at the same time we need the critics in the courtroom explaining the shortcomings of the science so that we don't have false evidence that is introduced or undue reliance on science that isn't quite there yet. my preference is recognize it's already there, but make sure that we have robust discussions about the validity of the science before people buy into it too much. >> yeah, i would just add that i basically agree that it's already
of a merger between art and science and advocacy in a funny way getting people to wake unand realize what is going on -- wake up and realize what is going on. so it is a memborial trying to get us to interpret history and look to the past. they have always been about lacking at the past so we proceed forward and maybe don't commit the same mistakes. >> thank you all for coming, i would like to really briefly introduce bonnie angle with the breast cancer fund, she is going to do a presentation for you on prevention, ways to preventolin ks of chemicals in breast cancer and i'll let her talk about the rest, bonnie, thank you for coming. >> alright. thank you all so much for being here today. i'm very excited to be able to give this presentation to you, unfortunately, i was expecting to have a co-presenter who had a minor accident and visited the emergency room this morning instead of visiting us, so we have plenty of folks from the breast cancer fund and other groups on hand to answer questions, but we are missing our policy geru unfortunately, i don't know how much this audience is familiar
, and he'll set money aside from his first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. [applause] >> we eat lots of beef in america and chicken. what about horse or zebra? why don't we eat those. aren't they kind of like cows? some of you shudder at the idea and it's illegal in some places like california and illinois, and conventional wisdom is it's not right to eat a zebra or water buffalo. so how are you repulsed and want do our taste test here? a few of you. is this wrong? well, that's bunk, as the chef at beaver creek ranch in texas. beaver creek is a resort where guests pay to hunt zebra, water buffalo, and this cute animal and then they ea kill and eat it after its been cooked by a chef. so, at the ranch, people come for this. they're not schemish. >> right. 14 different varieties of animals. pick out which animal you want to hunt for and take you out, we harvest the animal, bring it back, and i took it. >> and people say it tastes good? >> of course. >> and it's actually better for you because it's leaner? >> it is. and -- i've
have my two science leaders, [inaudible] and janet gray, so science questions galor, they can handle them all, policy questions, we'll have to deflect some of those to nancy for another time, so what i'm going to present today is what we call our healthy home and healthy world tours, i'll talk a little bit about who the breast cancer fund is and then we're going to walk through kind of the rooms in your home talking about tips for avoiding exposures that are linked to breast cancer and i will talk a little bit about the different chemicals, where they're found, things you can do to avoid them and also some policies, and then we'll kind of go beyond the home to talk about the kinds of exposures that might be not within our control in the house but elsewhere. and it looks like i have videos so that is good. so, the breast cancer fund is a national organization that works to prevent breast cancer by eliminating the environmental exposures linked o the disease, mostly we talk about chemicals and radiation that are linked to breast cancer, we are a little different from your breast cancer
unhelpful concept and i think that you have to ask the question from the legal system and from the science perspective as to what free will might mean. on the science side, the question really is, and this is what we were debating, is the question whether you can operationally define free will so you can measure it? from a scientist's standpoint, a construct doesn't really mean anything if you can't measure it. i have been asked many, many newer scientists including ken, what exactly does free will mean and how do you measure it? it could be like emotional control. it could be something like impulsivity, impulse control and you get back to the basic problem that chris who is a colleague of anita's at vanderbilt, wait he has put it, how do you distinguish and irresistible impulse from an impulse not resisted. there is a basic gray area, a difficult ability to say, did you actually choose that and did you choose it in a way that the law would recognize. so the law all of the time develops concepts that scientists are interested in studying. it might be competency, for example. well, competen
much. our next speaker is the co- founder and chief scientific officer of post-it science. he heads the company's goal team that has for more than three decades. he has been a leading pioneer in brain plasticity research. in the late 1980's, he was responsible for inventing something that i hope to own on my own, and in plans to approve my hearing. in 1996, he was the founder and ceo of scientific learning corporation, which markets and distributes software that applies principles of brain plasticity to assist children with language learning in reading. we are plowing -- proud to have him join us today to take part in this forum. [applause] >> thank you. i want to one-upping the mayor and say that today is my 70th birthday. [applause] still alive and raising cain. i also want to say that i am a proud citizen of this city and a public servant at the university of california, in this city for more than 45 years. it is wonderful to be here and wonderful to be with you today. i want to say, before i start, that you should understand that i was permitted by the university of california o
be scientists. there is all this talk about we have to do the recording to the science. while the talks might begin moving at a snail's pace -- like a caravan stuck in a sandstorm. everyone seems to be breaking your neck to get far away from the sides as possible. the world is already here. and whether the u.s. or any other country, including my own andhey are living in it -- i would hope maybe their kids would turn around and tell their parents, haven't you noticed? we are already there. >> that was ronny jumeau of the seychelles. before that, you heard jonathan pershing, the chief climate change negotiator. so far, the u.s. envoy tod stern has only held one news conference after one week and half. he was goodlett told another one today, but if you look at today's list of meetings, the event is the only one marked in red. a press conference was cancelled. ronny jumeau is with us here in doha, representative of the alliance of small island states. and we are joined by martin khor, executive director of the south centre in malaysia. ambassador, you're on the panel with the jonathan pershing, t
the planet's ever seen. >> reporter: he assures us nothing can go wrong with this fish, altered by science to grow and get to market faster. >> this fish is identical in every measurable way. >> reporter: have we gone too far? >> i wouldn't want to eat this fish, unless it's gone through a proper approval process. >> reporter: critics say the fda scientists didn't do enough independent work and used company data to come to its safety conclusions. some of which tested only six fish. >> that kind of science wouldn't make it past a high school science fair. >> reporter: is this something i should be afraid of? >> you eat dna every time you swallow. you consume dna with every food you eat. >> reporter: altered dna? >> the gene comes from the chinook salmon. pacific salmon. that protein is identical to the same protein that's produced by the atlantic salmon. >> reporter: and nothing's going to happen to me or my children if they eat this fish? >> it will make you healthier. man has been altering the nature of animals since man walked upright and began domesticating animals. the beef that we con
of sciences, the garden was designed by the california spring blossom and wildfilower association. here is a truly enchanting and tranquil garden along a path behind a charming gate. this garden is the spot to woo your date. stroll around and appreciate its unique setting. the gorgeous brick walkway and a brick wall, the stone benches, the rustic sundial. chaired the part -- share the bard's word hundred famous verses from a shakespearean plays. this is a gem to share with someone special. pack a picnic, find a bench, and enjoy the sunshine, and let the whimsical words of william shakespeare and floats you and your loved one away. this is one of the most popular wedding locations and is available for reservations. take a bus and have no parking worries. shakespeares' garden is ada accessible. located at the bottom of this hill, it is a secret garden with an infinite in captivating appeal. carefully tucked away, it makes the top of our list for most intimate pyknic setting. avoid all taurus cars and hassles by taking a cable car. or the 30, 45, or 91 bus. the garden was designed by thoma
science experiments i guess you could say with this guy who calls himself the crazy russian hacker. in both of these videos he tells us -- this is a beer bottle bet you will never lose. >> most people will grab it and you can see it will fall. >> the crazy russian hacker has a solution. >> grab it like that and knock it like that. >> bang on the table slightly pulling up on the dollar bill until, poof -- >> the dollar is yours. >> he's teaching you how to hustle your friends out of cash. all right. we like mints and gum around here because we don't want anybody to have dragon breath but the crazy russian hacker is going to show us how to have dragon breath if you want. all you need is some cornstarch and a piece of paper. >> safety is number one priority. today we are going to have a fire extinguisher close by. >> let it out and blow on it. >> i don't recommend trying that at home. >> it's funny. he says don't try this at home yet shows us how to try it at home in his own kitchen and says it's just about the science of it yet told us none of the science behind this. >> no science w
and technology and invention and art and science come which no other primate has done. very simple example of primates creating tools for using language, but it was indefinitely expandable hierarchical fashion. >> host: so you're thinking of the main functions of the neo cortex has been this high-level functions such as decision-making, inhibiting and proper actions. i mean, the neo cortex is a huge number of things. >> guest: it does lots of things that high on both levels and uses the same algorithm. i've recognized the ages of objects for crossfires ofa and obvious functions that he got at the high-level, how to recognize and say she's pretty but that was funny. it exists at the highest level of the conceptual hierarchy. one powerful piece of evidence that came out was what happens to be one, a region of the neo cortex of the optic nerve stillson, generally the process is a very primitive pattern and images, like the ages of objects. so this low-level, simple patterns. what happens to it and it congenitally blind person? it actually gets taken over by the frontal cortex to help that pro
that were based on ray sufrpgs -- observations. the science is poor. we have been living with that ever since. in the process we have obesity epidemic diabetes increased four fold. the usda the food guy pyramid might have gotten it right why is obesity and diabetes increasing so quickly? >> you are a science journalist. you are an md you went to stanford residency at johns h hopkins yet the nutritionnal instruction you got wasn't good? >> i thought it was. i followed it myself and told everybody around me to try to follow it. about two or three years ago i was 40 pounds over weight and prediabetic exercising 3 hours a day and eating all of the right food supposedly. it had me questioning what it was i was believing and what it was i was preaching. >> increase carbohydrates, reduce fat from 40 to 30 percent. this was based on research that led to the lathes food pyramid that told us to eat lots of breads then vegetable fruit less meat and milk now michelle obama has her new version out called my play. it is comforting to know this is all based onset elled science. the producer found this
. they are committed to science and social studies, arts, and other enrichment opportunities for all of our students. even in our mostpkñ?ñ? historically underserved schools, schools that previously wereÑññ?ñ? underachieving, the following examples illustrate in concrete terms the district -- to educating the entire child. framework has encouraged non-fiction reading especially in science and social studies. schools have purchased additional books with the funds available and material tolqñ?ñ? support student learning in all of the -- our school improvement grantrñ?ñ? leveraged resources have permitted us to make significant investments in technology and hardware that is being used across the curriculum. and in particular these investments further have>éñ?ñ? enhanced student interaction and engagement with science and social studies and even the arts curriculum. student funding has permitted the school to hire additional pe teachersióñ?ñ? while providing common planning relief time for classroom teachers to continue to col
. >> for more information, >> when the new california academy of sciences opened in 2008, it quickly became one of the top tourist magnets in the city. part of the cal academies' astronomical success is the weekly nightlife party. >> i am joined by helen, who is here to school me on all the nocturnal activities that are getting ready to take place here. tell us a little about what we can expect to see at nightlife. >> we open up the doors every thursday night at the california academy of sciences. there are certain things you can see every week you can go to the museum, visit the planetarium, and we bring in bars and a deejay or band. it is a different feel from during the day, something different every week. tonight , we have beer and music. -- tonight we have great beer and music. it is beer week. we have a dozen local brewers in african hall. we have a deejays to set up throughout the museum and a live performance at 9:00 p.m. tonight. >> what has been your favorite part as a participant or as an observer? >> my favorite part is to walk around the aquarium in to see people with a drink in th
a hybrid between electrical engineering and computer science because it world has many different sectors and you want to be versatile. you don't want to -- well, some of us would prefer to be experts in one field. for example programming or making robots, but i think being versed in both sides of the spectrum tells you tremendously understanding programming, electronics, signal processing, networking, chip design -- i could go on and on, and i think this will give us more opportunities in the area rather than being skilled in one thing. now i'm a senior and i am graduating in the spring, fingers crossed and i couldn't have made a better choice. i think computer engineering was the best choice for me. like i said opportunities are not always readily available. we all get nervous about that. sometimes we need to take charge and take those opportunities so last summer i decided to take it a step further and i applied for probably about 200 different interning opportunities that i saw available on craigslist and on company websites, on government websites and i got lucky a few of them c
frightening. >> tonight, frontline reports on the science and politics of the bitter "vaccine war." >> frontline is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you.and by the corporatir public broadcasting. major funding is provided by the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation, committed to building a more just, verdant, and peaceful world. and by reva and david logan, committed to investigative journalism as the guardian of the public interest. additional funding is provided by the park foundation, dedicated to heightening public awareness of critical issues. and by the frontline journalism fund. with grants from scott nathan and laura debonis, and the hagler family. >> what a cute little face. aww, here we come. it's a girl! >> yeah! >> she's beautiful. >> what's her name? >> rachel. >> she's beautiful. she doesn't want to cry. >> narrator: a new life begins. >> congratulations. >> thank you. >> narrator: out of her mother's womb, rachel murphy is now surrounded by a new world filled with countless germs. modern medicine will do what i
not think that there is any legitimate basis in science, medicine, or any ethical code that i know of or the bible, for that matter for our criminal law tdistinguishing between those wo have alcohol and tobacco and people who put other substances in their body. there is no legitimate basis for distinguishing between the alcoholic on the one hand under criminal law and between the drug addict on the other. that is first. the second ethical point is i hope most of you agree with this. i do not believe that anybody should be punished simply for what we put into our own bodies absent harm to others. nobody deserves to be punished for what we put in our bodies absent harm to others. hurt somebody, yes and not tell me your addiction was the excuse. we need to be regarded as sovereign over our minds and bodies. the criminal law should not be treating anyone as a criminal for what we put in here. when one is trying to pursue a particular public health or public safety objective, reducing the harm of drugs or whatever it might be. and when you have powerful evidence that a non-course of sys
issues. gang violence and brain science and crime, these are issues at the forefront and deserve all of our attention. this is a greatat>> your going p with me because i liked to wander around and see faces. you have learned more about me that a lot of people know. for the last 10 years i have been married to someone who was a deputy chief of the lapd and i now refer to him as being in recovery. at the same time, i have been working extensively with home with industries, and my brother said, if he had dreamed i would be married to a policeman and working with a priest, somebody would be lying. i have been working with gangs and been involved with gangs, trying to figure them out for 34 years. i began as a young social worker in south los angeles. with gang infested housing projects that are now almost mythic, jordan downs and nickerson gardens, and i worked in these projects during what is referred to as the decade of death, when crack and unregulated gun availability laid waste to communities of color. in los angeles during the late 1980's and early 1990's, there were 1000 homicides
or -- yeah? >> i believe so, is that true? yes, my science advisors, that's why they're here. >> [inaudible]. >> yeah. there are a lot of carcinogens in diesel exhaust, yeah. >> [inaudible]. >> well, you're still seeing an oil that combusts, some of them we know burn more cleanly than others but if it's combusting, you end up with productions of combustion, it may not be better for pollution on the other side, depending on how clean the air burns and that's a theme we end up talking about a fair bit unfortunately is that bio doesn't always mean it's safer, it can, it can definitely mane we're reducing destruction of greenhouse gases but it can still make bad things outs of good ingredients if you know what i mean, another outdoor thing is to reduce your reliance on household pesticides so the active ingredients can be of concern, the pesticide itself, but most pesticide companies done label what are called the inert ingredient, that's the one that's not doing the pest killing per se, they can still really be bad chemicals, endocrine sdrukt tersest can be there, your baby crawls on your lawn
science and translating it to beautiful narrative that everybody could relate to. so should become one of america's most celebrated and beloved authors. a subset she turned into a different direction. it is a disturbing book, a worrisome book that pointed out that we were doing to ourselves by the careless use of pesticides in many different places. well, since it's meant 1962 any more thought would explain a little more for you about to rachel carson was. she was born in 1907 in this house in springdale, pennsylvania near pittsburgh and allegheny river. she was born about the upstairs bedrooms of this has come with at the time did not have that addition on the right-hand side dish ec. it stopped at the chimney on the right. a simple, modest house, to downstairs into upstairs. there is no central heat, no indoor plumbing. data couplet outhouses up that come to a shed in the front where they occasionally kept the horse. it was a little bit in the??? words.? it wasn't completely in the country, but there is enough property around????????t carson could explore the was often wi
into confirming that einstein was right. let me say a neat thing about science too. in a lot of fields, there'll be some sort of hero like einstein's our hero, here. we all love einstein. most of us do, yeah. so, einstein's our hero, and you tend to think, "well, if he's a hero, you don't wanna take shots at him." but in science, it's different. in science, say "hero-schmero." everybody is trying to crack that hero and find something wrong. everyone's attacking to see if they can find something wrong. and so science doesn't rest upon the reputation of some hero. science rests upon everyone else trying to find a crack in that theory. and all attempts, so far, have only gone on to substantiate this: time really is different when you're moving. but i'll tell you what? we're gonna talk more about these ideas next time and you know what i wanna do for you now? i wanna share with you a film that a friend of mine made way back in 1976. when i was teaching these ideas in the early '70s, i discovered this kind of treatment at the class board. that's one thing about teaching, you learn at the class boa
in the fields of engineering, science, and math -- you dig, the numbers are fairly is stunning. -- fairly stunning. roughly 44% of graduates are in those skills. europe is at 24%. i say this respectfully, and i know we are on c-span. when the your pants -- the europeans are outpacing us, in these key fields that will drive innovation, then you know we are in trouble. i would correct one comment. there have been at some of us, chris coons and marco rubio, we have put forward legislation long before the election that said, let's look at this talent competition issue. let's put forward an approach that many of us, those of us that have been from the business world, have been talking about for decades. let's recognize that while we need to do more to prime the pump in terms of science and engineering or math graduates, native-born americans, particularly focusing on losing the numbers in middle school where girls and children of college had enormous challenges, that is something we will have to come back to. we also have to continue to attract talent from around the world. one of the ways tha
science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: house republicans today offered their counter- offer to the president's plan for a deal both sides say is needed to avoid year-end tax increases. the move was the latest volley in an increasingly tense face- off between the two branches of government. >> with 28 days left to come to a deal on the nation's fiscal cliff, the white house is holding firm on its proposal to raise taxes on the wealthy. spokesman jay carney. >> the obstacle remains at this point the refusal to acknowledge by republican leaders that there is no deal that achieves the kind of balance that is necessary without raising rates on the top 2% wealthiest americans. the math simply does not add up. >> ifill: the white house proposes raising $1.6 trillion in taxes over ten years, imposin
long- range basic science and basic research areas, which support all of these innovations as a platform, if you will. government investment in basic science for example, in biotechnology and genomics, has created a whole new growth industry where the u.s. is the world leader. those are examples where the government and industry together both can do things which help build our economic future. > the book holds some fascinating insights. "producing prosperity" it is called. willy shee, one of the authors. thank you so much. > > thank you bill. still ahead, rebuilding the housing market by fixing the foreclosure crisis. an update is coming up next. when we decided to update ourselves on the foreclosure process in america, we didn't have to search very far. chicago ranks 3rd in the nation compared to other cities. by state, it's california, michigan, texas, and georgia leading the way with the most completed foreclosures this year. joining us on set this morning is mary jones. she is the executive director agora community services. good morning to you. > > good morning. thank
that >> i was going to say even though it is not darn -- not a 100% science -- [ talking over each other ] >> 100% science that has accuracy, a little less -- okay stop digging. [ talking over each other ] >> they didn't rate meteorologists i wonder who is dragging who down? [ laughing ] >> touche. >>> good morning. here's a look at a dry picture from sutro tower across san francisco towards the east bay hills. live doppler, scattered sprinkles northwest corner sonoma county where we are watching now, heavier rain lake and mendocino counties where going to stay for the better part of the morning commute. radar there the benefit of having live doppler 7 hd so far to the west already picking rain 90 miles offshore that going to take the better part of three hours to get to the coast. the sooner you get in northern sonoma the more likely you are going to be dry. upper 40s concord, live more, redwood city, los gatos, everybody else in the low to mid 50s. monterey bay, upper 40s to near 50. let's move on and talk about this forecast cycle, rain best in the north bay during the daylight hours
-opportunities a summer science program[me teachers that focus on a youth p.o.w. wow. ask the commissioner fewer to read the rest. >> commissioner fewer: whereas the parent advisory committee of the indian education program consists of parentsñ?ñ?ñ aides representatives, teachers administration and community members to -- on the distribution of the research provided for the program based on multiple data sources for a variety of services, and where pac empowers families, students and community6ó?n<ñq8 members and community to members that take an active and substantial role in thexét8k children's educationvx%f experience and whereas the program continues to collaborate with local÷ 2í3 ensure the delivery of quality services to support the:g(úbgd educational and cultural5]o+ and alaskan native studentsrvy'a including thewto9wa% american program san francisco and the urban trail san francisco system of care project, friendship house association indians-p<í='e, inc. of san francisco youth program. the2 s ák beço boardt
is cyber bullying and the top scholars in the country and in social science and psychology that saying that, so that's an important distinction so thank you both so much. >> and there is that and -- there's a balance between -- i mean when i hear that bullying is going down i mean all of us should rejoice because that to me is indicative of the fact of the work in communities across the country are starting to pay off, but it's going to be hard in this ark and we are in this area and people are coming forward, kids are coming forward . suicides that would have been kept forward or not reporting and we're learning thanks to rapid fire and thanks to social networking or facebook and this is a sued -- all of this the -- the volume of bullying is going to rise in proportion with i think the actual drop in occurrences so to balance that and be aware of that i think is important. >>i totally agree, and that's really to rosylyn's point about this being a very, very important moment and we need to did it right. just on the subject of suicide the surgeon general came out this week and there was a
into san francisco. in addition we have a tourist sector going on, life sciences going on. everybody is innovating in the right places and doing it here in san francisco and there is a strong spirit and we will continue growth and jobs everybody. we want to help everybody out and support each other and that comes to what we do here in san francisco. today i am announcing a new initiative and clean tech sf initiative which we launching with all of you. there are three part it is of this. the first part is we're working with the california clean energy fund. i know jeff anderson is here today as part of them and he's going to be partners with us, and he's partners in every branch that we doing. the first thing we're doing as clean tech sf we will establish innovation zones in san francisco. what does that mean? we asked last time when we were here in san francisco and how can we help? perhaps we can help with the resources that the city doesn't use to the highest use. let's take our space. we have a lot of assets under utilized. how can we allow the demonstrations that you'r
test scores and the amount of time spept in the classroom. not in math or science or in anything. u.s. students spend more time in the class rom than kid in the chin affin land and japan. that helps one person and that is the teacher unions where the recip yepts of the spending. if you want to help the kids privatize the system. before the late 1880s it was home schooled and private and more choice and better out come for all. >> john, is it worth it or the education of the kids is worth it? >> i don't think there is a correlation. i think johnathon is right here. i don't agree with privatization of all schools. 20 years we had a best education system . we still have great teachers and school accident, but as a system, we are failing and we are falling down behind other countries. you look at oecd inwe are falling back every year. it is not the amount much time, it is what they are getting while they are there. and we don't have the ability to merit base teacher or students and we have a problem of the infrastructure. >> christian, what about the economics of all of we know that sta
takes the time ininterweave phone book pages? >> they do it for science purposes. the only thing holding it are interweaved pages of two books. >> they have this car tied to the with a crane. you see the phone books. >> we have all four wheels off the ground. >> no way. no way. no way. >> way. >> noise is coming from it. >> it is impressive. the laws of friction and lifting the car and phone books. who needs superglue. >> there is only one problem. >> the only way this car drops to the ground is with a little help. >> drop it. they set the book on fire. >> there is notape on the er ta nothing binding the phone books together other than friction. >>> i think this is a really cute idea but i think if you hand the keys over to the dogs he is not going to come home. >> the keys? >> yes. to the car. these dogs were rescued by the spca in new zealand. they decided to team up with mini couper and teach dogs to drive. it looks like they are trying to teach these dogs how to drive. >> that dog is driving. >> i like how they all have different driving styles, too. one has the hand up here. this is
in the christian science monitor noted that when he passed in the street, the young men would call out, hello, chris. they knew his face. would laugh and say hello always. this is the right way to deal with our people, he said. libyan friends said he was always ready to put his country first. he shone by being himself, interested in the lives of ordinary people. his death was met with shock and sadness in libya. feelings with regard to americans that are rare in that part of the world these days. for me that judgment captures key characteristics of chris and his approach to life and work. secretary of state hillary clinton noted chris's swearing in as ambassador to libya on an earlier tour, he was visiting roman ruins at one of the tourist sites in libya. he was trailed by gadhafi security men who were obviously intimidating to other tourists. as she recounted it, he reached over to one of the men, stole his camera out of his hands and started taking pictures of the men who had been following him. they were so dumbfounded that they had to laugh. after a quick conversation, chris convinced the
in the last five years. >> well, there have been major events. what's unusual about this event in science history is it's occurred in a narrow window and across a very broad front. it's not one technology. it's the fact that we can sequence genomes, your entire genome profile in a few hours with a few hundred dollars which took billions of dollars and a decade. we have the ability to analyze those data through very statistical computations structures and artificial intelligence. >> so if i look at it. you show me a machine that now sequences dnas, the size of a large refrigerator. that is now more powerful than -- much more powerful than a machine five years ago? >> well, that machine in nine days, a 24/7 run, one machine could exceed the data generation of all of the machines in the u.s. in the year 2007. >> you also talk about how computing has become not only faster but much more sophisticat sophisticated. >> the most exciting is artificial intelligence. we're a third artificial intelligence where computers can think. they can think in a text real way where computers can help us make d
? >> there have been major events and what's unusual about this period in science history is that it's occurred in a narrow window and across a very broad front. so it's not one technology, it's the fact that we can sequence genomes, the entire tumor profile in a few hours for a few hundred dollars what took billions of dollars and a decde aid, question have the -- >> if i look at just to understand that advance in computing. you showed me a machine that now sequences dna, it's the side of a large refrigerator. that is now more powerful than, much more powerful than a machine just five years ago? >> well, that machine in nine days a 24/7 run, one machine, could exceed the data generation of all of the machines in the united states in the year 2007. >> you also talked about how computing has become just faster, but much more sophisticated. >> we're now a third generation artificial intelligence where computers can think, they can actually think in a con tech churl way which allows us to make decisions based on vast amounts of information. game changing. >> i think we all understand, at least i t
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